PROPOSAL TO ADD WOMEN’S ROWING AS A VARSITY SPORT

 

UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO, BOULDER

 

 

Prepared by:

 

Julie DiBiase[1]

Hannah Gosnell[2]

 

 

January 20, 1999


TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

I. INTRODUCTION.............................................................................................. 4

II. INTRODUCTION TO THE SPORT OF ROWING...................................... 5

The Basics of Collegiate Rowing....................................................................... 5

A Brief History of Rowing.................................................................................. 5

NCAA Women’s Rowing and Title IX............................................................... 6

Rowing at CU...................................................................................................... 7

III. WHY A WOMEN'S VARSITY ROWING PROGRAM AT CU?................ 8

General Arguments for Varsity Women's Rowing............................................ 8

Specific Arguments for Adding Varsity Women’s Rowing at CU................... 10

IV. STARTING A WOMEN’S VARSITY PROGRAM AT CU....................... 12

Budget................................................................................................................ 12

Facility Needs.................................................................................................... 12

Auxiliary Support Needs................................................................................... 13

Coaching Needs................................................................................................ 14

V. SUMMARY..................................................................................................... 15

VI.  CREDITS...................................................................................................... 16

 

APPENDIX Ia:  Initial ONE-TIME Funding........................................... 17

APPENDIX Ib:  BUDGETS 1999-2002.............................................................. 18

APPENDIX Ic: 1998-1999 Club Budget...................................................... 19

APPENDIX II:  SAMPLE RACE SCHEDULE................................................. 21

APPENDIX III: COLORADO CREW  -- WOMEN’S PERFORMANCE...... 22

APPENDIX IV: ROWING PROGRAMS, DIV. I, CENTRAL REGION....... 24

APPENDIX V:  HOW ROWING COMPARES TO OTHER SPORTS........... 25

NCAA CHAMPIONSHIPS 1999 WOMEN’S ROWING HANDBOOK (attached)

MEDIA GUIDE, UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN ROWING (attached)

  

 

 


I. INTRODUCTION

 

            This document explains why the time is ripe for the University of Colorado to consider adding women's rowing to its roster of varsity sports.  Women's rowing already exists at CU under the auspices of Colorado Crew, a student organization. The women of Colorado Crew have performed remarkably well at the regional and national levels, given their modest resources. With the support of the CU Athletic Department, there is no doubt that CU Women's Rowing could emerge as a leader in the newly developing NCAA women's collegiate rowing community. 

 

Highlights of this document:

Ø      An introduction to the sport of rowing, its relationship with Title IX, its presence at CU, and its evolving role in the Midwest region (Section II). 

Ø      The advantages of women’s rowing as a varsity sport – both in general and at CU in particular (Section III).

Ø      The pertinent details for starting a program at CU (Section IV).

Ø      Rough budgets for a varsity program (Appendix I).

Ø      How rowing compares to some other sports in terms of participation and protocol (Appendix V).

Ø      NCAA 1999 Women’s Rowing Handbook (Attached).


 

II. INTRODUCTION TO THE SPORT OF ROWING

 

The Basics of Collegiate Rowing

            Rowers compete in shells (boats) of different sizes. At the collegiate level, the priority boat is almost always the coxed eight (8+). Eights consist of a "crew" of 8 rowers and a coxswain.  The coxswain calls commands and steers the boat.  Collegiate rowers also compete in coxed fours (4+), and occasionally in straight pairs (2-) of two rowers and no coxswain.

            There are two weight classes in the sport of rowing: open weight and lightweight. Female lightweight rowers must weigh 130 lbs or less at race time. Not all collegiate rowing programs accommodate lightweight rowing. Top collegiate rowers often have body types similar to volleyball players, but rowers of all shapes and sizes have found success in college rowing.

             Rowing is a 26 week sport.  There are two seasons, fall and spring, with a winter training session in between. The NCAA allows for 20 hrs/week of training in the fall and spring and 8 hrs/week in the winter. Spring is the main racing season. 

Spring races, called sprints, are 2000 meters (6-8 minutes) in length. Rowing is considered to be one of the most physically challenging sports because of the aerobic and anaerobic demands inherent in racing this distance.

            Fall races, called head races, average 5000-6000 meters (15-25 minutes)  in length.  The Head of the Charles, which takes place in Boston, MA, is the biggest head race in the world, attracting thousands of rowers -- collegiate, recreational, and elite -- from around the world.

Rowers generally train indoors during the winter on indoor rowing machines (ergometers), in the weight room, and optionally in tanks (indoor rowing facilities).  Most top collegiate programs located in cold weather climates spend two weeks training offsite (e.g., Florida, Texas, or California) during the winter months: one week during winter break and one week during spring break.

            Collegiate rowing teams typically compete in 2-4 head races in the fall, and 6-8 regattas in the spring, including Regional Championships, and National Championships in early June if they are selected (see NCAA Women's Rowing Handbook, appended, for details on selection process).            

 

A Brief History of Rowing

               

Early 1800’s.  Rowing is made popular in Britain.

Mid 1800’s.  Rowing migrates to the United States and becomes popular with professional gamblers.

1852.   First intercollegiate competition takes place between Harvard and Yale.

 

1858.   Philadelphia's Schuylkill Navy founded; this is the first rowing association  and the first amateur sports organization.

1872.   Collegiate and amateur oarsmen start the National Association for Amateur Oarsmen (NAAO) in 1872. Women are left out of these clubs even after they have begun rowing in amateur and collegiate races.

1873.   Women begin to row at Wellesley College.  Women’s rowing is purely for “recreation and health”, not competition.

1930’s. Ernestine Bayer founds the Philadelphia Girls Rowing Club, the first        rowing program for women in the United States.

1962 .  The National Women's Rowing Association is formed.

1980.   First Women’s Collegiate Rowing Championship held in Oak Ridge, TN.

1982.   The NAAO and the National Women's Rowing Association join together to become the co-ed United States Rowing Association.  USRowing is still the prevailing governing board in the rowing community today. 

1996.   NCAA adds championship women’s rowing.

 

NCAA Women’s Rowing and Title IX

                Women's rowing is booming in the United States, in large part because of Title IX and the NCAA designation of women's rowing as a championship sport in 1996. Universities around the country have found women's rowing programs to be a powerful tool in the quest for gender equity under Title IX because of high athlete participation numbers and large numbers of allowable scholarships:

 

ü            Rowing programs typically accommodate 50-70 women. This team size is necessary for a realistic shot at a “team bid” for NCAA championships, which currently involves 23 athletes.  The team event is expected to increase to 32-37 seats within the next few years, necessitating still larger participation numbers. 

ü            The NCAA allows more scholarships for women's rowing - 20 - than for any other women's sport. Legislation is pending to raise the limit from 20 to 25. 

ü            Although rowing requires an initial capital investment, the long-term cost per athlete is one of the lowest of any women’s varsity sport. 

 

                Since 1994 (in anticipation of NCAA designation) about 10 universities per year have added women’s varsity rowing programs. Currently there are 120 programs competing for the NCAA title. Two years ago, women's crew had the fourth highest increase in participation among all NCAA sports, adding 375 more student-athletes from 1995-96 to 1996-97, for a total of 3,951. Because of its generally high participation rates, low cost per athlete, large number of allowable scholarships and high coach to athlete ratio, women’s rowing and Title IX have made comfortable bedfellows across the United States in recent years. 

 

Rowing at CU

            At CU, rowing has been going strong since 1991 when the team was founded.  Since its inception, the team has been primarily self-funded.  In the early days, the team had a bare bones operating budget and very little equipment with which to practice and race. With the help of generous donations, clever fundraising, patient volunteer coaches, higher club dues, and the passage of a referendum which allocates 50 cents of all student semester fees to Colorado Crew, the team has grown steadily. Relative to varsity programs, however, the team operates on a shoestring budget with sub-standard equipment and little or no support from the University.

            Despite these challenges, the team has built a national and regional reputation as a solid and competitive program.  Our women’s participation numbers have grown steadily since 1991:  15 in 1991, 35 in 1994, 55 in 1998. Typically over 100 women sign up to row in the fall, but with attrition, the women's team usually numbers 30-40 by late spring; many rowers are deterred by steep membership dues of over $1000 per year. 

Colorado’s rowers are some of the most dedicated club athletes on campus.  They train five to six days per week, year round, from 5:15-7:00am; additionally, they often execute a second afternoon workout on their own.  Team members spend their entire spring break training two times daily.  In contrast, sports like softball and field hockey practice only three times per week, in season. 

            This dedication has not gone without reward.  Appendix III gives a complete history of Colorado Crew's very favorable results. That these results were achieved with a minimal operating budget (Appendix Ic) is a testament to the potential that a CU Varsity Rowing program could realize.  A varsity program at CU program at CU would not be starting from scratch as some other Midwest schools have done: it would be starting with an established, successful group of athletes. With very little effort and in very little time, we believe CU could be a dominant presence in the women’s rowing community, both locally and nationally.

 


III. WHY A WOMEN'S VARSITY ROWING PROGRAM AT CU?

 

General Arguments for Varsity Women's Rowing

 

Large Numbers of Athletes.   A typical rowing program accommodates 50 to 70 women. Since rowing is largely a "walk-on" sport (75% of collegiate rowers learn how to row in college), it is not unusual to have more than 100 women (mostly freshmen) try out for the "novice" team.[3]  In order to otherwise gain these numbers, an athletic department would have to add 3-4 sports.  In order to augment these participation numbers still more, many schools have also added a program for lightweight rowers (usually a 50% increase in numbers).

 

Large Number of Allowed Scholarships.  Perhaps more important for Colorado, NCAA rules allow more scholarships for rowing than for any other sport. Universities may award 20 "equivalency" scholarships, and legislation is pending to raise that number to 25. This means that as many as 80 or more women can benefit from partial scholarships at one time. In comparison, women's softball, lacrosse, and field hockey are each allowed only 12 scholarships.

 

Ability to be Competitive Without Scholarships.  Since 75% of all college rowers have no prior rowing experience, it is possible to run a competitive varsity program without the aid of scholarships.  A top-notch novice squad can feed a varsity team in a way that obviates the need for scholarships.  This is unique to the sport of rowing.

 

Room for New Powerhouses in Women's Rowing Since women's rowing has been a "championship" sport for only 2 years, and because of its attractiveness to schools with Title IX problems, scores of programs have been established during the past 3 years.[4] As a result, the top programs are changing on a yearly basis. Both University of North Carolina and Michigan State University, for example, qualified for the NCAA Championships in their first years as varsity programs (1997-1998). UMass, in its first year as a Varsity program in 1996-1997, came in second (in the I Eights) to traditional powerhouse Washington. Similarly, USC won the I Fours event in 1998, its first year as a varsity program.  The door is wide open for new programs to establish themselves at the forefront of the sport.

 

Cost Effective to Sustain Program.  Excluding the initial capital outlay for equipment, rowing is a comparatively cost effective sport, with a very low dollar per athlete ratio. Of all the varsity sports at UVA, for example, women’s rowing has the lowest cost per athlete[5]. At Kansas, the women's rowing budget is comparable to that of softball, volleyball, and soccer; but the rowing program supports more than twice as many women.[6]

 

Efficient Coach/Athlete Ratio.  The cost effective nature of rowing stems in part from a coach to athlete ratio of approximately 1:20. Compare this to basketball at 1:3, football at 1:10, volleyball at 1:6, tennis at 1:5, softball at 1:8 and soccer at 1:12.

 

Race Schedules Complement Academic Schedules.  Rowers compete in a minimum of 6 and a maximum of 20 regattas during the racing season, and competitions are always on weekends. Athletes miss very little, if any, class time because of racing and travel. In contrast, sports like softball require a minimum of 27 games during the season, and many of these take place away from school during the week.

 

High Quality Students.  Rowers are well-known for their academic prowess. They boast high GPAs and unrivaled graduation rates.  For example, the PAC-10 Conference suspended its academic counselor rule (one counselor per 25 athletes) because “rowing does not have a problem with academic progress and graduation.”

 

Alumnae Involvement.  Even the largest rowing programs rely on some donations for equipment.  Because rowing is a lifetime sport for many athletes, alumnae have a long-term concern for the sport and the program. Rowers carry their undergraduate academic successes through life and often become highly successful, high-profile professionals.  The purchasing power of the rowing community, and their tendency to give back to the sport, has been well-established.

 

Fitness.  Rowing is recognized by medical studies as one of the best all-around fitness activities. It can easily be done for life, either recreationally or competitively. 

 

Anyone Can Row.  With lightweight and heavyweight categories, women of all body types can compete. The sport can accommodate women under 5' (usually coxswains) as well as women up to 6’6”.

 

 

Specific Arguments for Adding Varsity Women’s Rowing at CU

 

The Midwest is an Emerging Rowing Region.  Women's rowing is booming throughout the nation, and nowhere more so than in the Midwest. The Central Region (one of 4 NCAA Regions for rowing) is the fastest growing and the most competitive, taking the place of the formerly dominant Ivy League rowing programs. In part because of the large athlete pool from which to choose, big universities like Michigan, Michigan State, UVA, and UMass are among the top programs in the country after only one or two years with Varsity status. In the Big 10, Michigan, Michigan State, Ohio State, Iowa, and Notre Dame all added women's rowing programs during the last five years. Indiana will add women's rowing next year. Appendix IV lists all Central Region women’s rowing programs.

 

The Big 12 is an Emerging Rowing Conference.  In the Big 12, Kansas, Kansas State, and University of Texas (which last year recruited one of the top women's rowing coaches in the country) have all developed varsity programs in the past 1 to 4 years, and eagerly await the addition of more Big 12 schools to the NCAA rowing circuit. Baylor plans to add a program in 2000, and Nebraska and OSU are seriously considering adding women's rowing to their roster of varsity of sports. According to KSU Associate Athletic Director Cindy Fox, a Big 12 Conference Rowing Championship could be inaugurated with as few as five participating schools. CU has the opportunity to be one of the forerunners in women’s rowing for a future Big 12 Conference. If rowing is established as a Conference sport, the Big 12 may be eligible to apply for a USOC Development Grant. The ACC and the Atlantic 10 were each recently awarded $1 million to further develop the sport of women's rowing in their respective conferences. 

 

Established Rowing Program on Campus. CU students show great enthusiasm for rowing and Colorado Crew, a student organization which has existed on campus since 1991. Each year hundreds of prospects come to the recruiting meetings, and typically at least 100 women sign up to row on Colorado Crew's novice women's team (compared to turnouts of 20-30 for field hockey and softball). As noted earlier, high dues account for about 50% attrition by mid-season.

 

CU Student Support of Rowing. The CU general student body has shown its support for Colorado Crew as well. In the spring of 1996, students voted in a referendum to add 50 cents each semester to their student fees to fund travel expenses for Colorado Crew. The additional $24,000/year of student support helps Colorado Crew achieve its modest goals.

 

Existing Athlete Pool.  In terms of athlete potential, there is no doubt that CU already harbors the makings of a nationally ranked women's rowing team, which could be supplemented with in-state and out-of-state recruiting. Considering the modest equipment and small budget the current team has to work with, the women of Colorado Crew have performed remarkably well, winning medals at major regional regattas and sending several members on to National Team Development Camps (see Appendix III). Boulder attracts athletic women who are often open to new athletic experiences, and a CU Women's Rowing Team could capitalize on that.

 

Altitude Training.  No other rowing team in the country trains at altitude.  Because of the aerobic/anaerobic nature of the 2000m race, altitude training is of particular consequence to this event.  Our athletes, many of whom grow up 5000 feet or more above sea level, have a distinct advantage over the greater rowing community.

 

National Exposure for the University.  Because a CU Women's Rowing Team would have an extensive travel itinerary and a large number of athletes, it would provide good exposure for the University. People are always curious when they see Colorado Crew at regattas around the country, and want to know more about CU. 

 


 

IV. STARTING A WOMEN’S VARSITY PROGRAM AT CU

 

Budget

 

We have made an assumption that if CU were to adopt women’s rowing as a varsity sport, it would want to develop a program equivalent in size, capacity and potential to its Big 12 counterparts.  Much research has been done to insure that the bottom line is realistic; the actual line items in the budget will need to be revisited in a later version of this proposal.  For example, it may be possible to “graduate” some equipment from the existing club team. 

The consensus among Division I rowing coaches in the Midwest seems to be that a competitive program can be sustained for anywhere from $400,000-$500,000 per year.  This number includes coaches salaries and five scholarships per year (for a total of 20 simultaneous scholarships).

Appendix Ia outlines the one time capital costs for starting up a varsity program. Appendix Ib provides rough operating budgets for the next three years, starting in Fall of 1999.  Appendix Ic contains Colorado Crew’s 1998-1999 operating budget, for comparison.

 

 

Facility Needs

 

Water.  Colorado Crew currently practices at Boulder Reservoir, a 10 minute drive from campus. The diameter of the reservoir, however, is not large enough to host a 2000 meter competition.  We suggest looking into obtaining permission to hold regattas, and perhaps even practice, on alternate water space, e.g. Horsetooth Reservoir, Gross Reservoir, Carter Lake.

Boathouse.  Colorado Crew currently has racks for its boats at the Boulder Reservoir, but the boats are exposed to the elements. With the purchase of valuable new equipment, a boathouse of some sort would be necessary. A temporary structure could cost as little as $50,000; alternately, top rowing programs around the country typically spend around $1 million on facilities which include locker room, showers, and, oftentimes, an area for hosting university functions.  A “middle-of-the-road” structure would run about $250-$300K.  In many cases (e.g., Michigan, UMass), the university coordinates with the city or state to build a facility that will benefit the public as well as the team. In CU's case, building a boathouse would require coordination with the City of Boulder (or other relevant government).

Vans.  The team would need vans to seat approximately 60 rowers for daily transportation to and from Boulder Reservoir (or alternate venue) during the fall and spring.

Erg Room.  Rowers train year round.  In the off season, and also during the racing season, rowers train on indoor rowing machines ("ergometers" or  "ergs").  A varsity team would require a well-ventilated space in which to layout 8-16 rowing machines initially, with the potential to expand to 25 machines over time.  During non-practice hours, rowing machines can be folded and stored in 1/10th of the space that they require during practice. At CU, the Fieldhouse, Carlson Gym, or Coors Events Center could conceivably accommodate this need.

Access to Weight and Conditioning Facilities.  A CU women’s rowing team would require access to Dal Ward and CU’s Speed, Strength and Conditioning program.

Access to Training Room.

 

 

Auxiliary Support Needs

 

Trainer.  Women’s rowing would add a minimum of 60 women to CU’s athlete pool.  This may require additional training personnel on staff.  Some schools have gotten around this by hiring graduate students.

Strength Trainer.  The Speed, Strength, and Conditioning Program may need to hire additional trainers to accommodate the rowing team.

Academic Advising Counselor.  Administrative resources may need to be dedicated to checking credit hour compliance, GPA’s, etc.

Priority Scheduling.  Rowers are limited to practicing at certain times of the day, based on daylight hours and availability of flat water.  This generally limits in-season practice times to between 6 and 10am.  Accordingly, rowers need priority access to course scheduling in advance of standard registration time for the general student body.

Secretary/ Manager.  Because of the large amount of travel associated with rowing in the Midwest, there is a lot of time involved in coordinating relevant regattas and equipment.  It is advisable to hire a dedicated administrator.  Some universities have implemented a creative solution to this problem: a business school scholarship dedicated to team management; or, in the case of Michigan, a work-study student.

Compliance.  Novice rowers will not have gone though Clearinghouse.  A large part of the novice fall season is dedicated to dealing with compliance, usually requiring most of the novice coach’s time, in conjunction with a compliance assistant.

Media Relations.  The team would need to develop and maintain a web site, media guide and recruiting materials.  See also Sample Media from University of Wisconsin Rowing (attached).

 

 

Coaching Needs

 

Head Coach - $45-60K. Primary responsibilities include: varsity training and coaching; recruiting; program direction and vision.  

Assistant Coach - $30-35K. Primary responsibilities include: assistant varsity training and coaching; assistant recruiting.

Novice Coach - $25-30K. Primary responsibilities include: novice training and coaching; assistant recruiting; compliance. 

Optional Auxiliary Coach - $20K or part-time.  Generally called a ‘boatperson’ or rigger, primary responsibilities include: boat, launch, trailer, and boathouse maintenance; driving the boat trailer to regattas.

 

           


V. SUMMARY

 

Based on extensive conversations with rowing coaches around the country, athletic directors at other Big 12 schools, USRowing, and the NCAA, we have concluded that the time is ripe for women’s rowing at CU.  Adding a program now will allow CU to establish itself as a dominant rowing force in the Midwest region and at the national level.

 

We believe that rowing aligns nicely with the local and regional athletic community, the University of Colorado Athletic Department’s goals and missions, and the emerging Big 12 Rowing Conference. 

 

In light of the data provided in this report, and in the spirit of Title IX, we would like to encourage the University of Colorado to adopt women’s rowing as a varsity sport. 

 


 

VI.  CREDITS

 

This report was prepared by Julie DiBiase and Hannah Gosnell. 

 

 

Julie DiBiase is currently the Novice Men’s coach for Colorado Crew.  Julie was the Head Varsity Men’s and Women’s coach for Colorado Crew in 1994-1995, when she successfully took the program from recreational to competitive in a single season.  Julie has also coached at the Marin Rowing Association and Mills College Crew.  In 1995, Julie received her Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Colorado, Boulder.  She has recently returned to Boulder, where she runs a computer consulting business in her spare time. 

 

 

Hannah Gosnell currently coaches the Novice Women for Colorado Crew. Hannah graduated from Brown University in 1988, where she rowed for four years and helped lead her team to two regional championships and a third place finish at Nationals in 1988. More recently, she was a member of the 1997 National Women's Rowing Team that competed in Aiguebelette, France. Hannah is currently working on her PhD in the Department of Geography at CU.

 

 

We would like to thank the following parties for their informative conversations with us about this report:

 

Rob Salcido, Executive Director of the Board of Directors, Colorado Crew

Kel Shively, Varsity Women’s Coach, Colorado Crew

Erin Hudson, Novice Women’s Coach, Colorado Crew

David Larson, Varsity Men’s Coach, Colorado Crew

Jim Buckalew, Field Service Coordinator, US Rowing,

Donna Noonan , NCAA,

Willie Black, US Rowing,

Ashlee Patten, Assistant Coach, University of Virginia Women’s Rowing

Kevin Harris, Head Coach, Mills College Crew

Carie Graves, Head Coach, University of Texas Women’s Rowing

Jenny Hale, Head Coach, Kansas State University

Steve Knapp, Head Coach, Creighton University

Mark Rothstein, Head Coach, University of Michigan

Amy Perko, Associate Athletic Director and SWA, University of Kansas

Cindy Fox, Associate Athletic Director and SWA, Kansas State University

Leigh Ann Perry, Athletic Department, Baylor University


 

APPENDIX Ia:  Initial ONE-TIME Funding

 

Boats and Related

 

 

 

 

 

3 Eights (new or excellent used) and accessories @ 18,000

 $     54,000

 

2 Fours and accessories @11,000

 $     22,000

 

4 Sets of 8 Oars @ 250

 

 

 $       8,000

 

Painting Oars in CU colors

 

 $       1,000

 

Spare Parts

 

 

 $       2,000

 

5 sets of Slings @ 100

 

 $          500

 

Rigging and Boat Maintenance Tools

 $       4,000

 

Miscellaneous

 

 

 $       5,000

 

Sub-Total

 

 

 

 $   106,500

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boathouse (temporary)

 

 

 

 

 $   50,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

Travel Equipment

 

 

 

 

 

Boat Trailer – share with Colorado Crew

 

 

 $              0

 

Truck (1 ton) for pulling trailer

 

 $     25,000

 

Boat Straps

 

 

 $          200

 

Sub-Total

 

 

 

 $     25,200

 

 

 

 

 

 

Land Training Equipment

 

 

 

 

16 Rowing Machines @ 750

 

 $     12,000

 

16 Heart Rate Monitors @100

 

 $       1,600

 

TV, VCR and Camcorder

 

 $       2,000

 

Sub-Total

 

 

 

 $     15,600

 

 

 

 

 

 

Safety Equipment

 

 

 

 

 

3 Coaching Launches @5000

 

 $     15,000

 

8 Sets of lights @ $50

 

 $          400

 

20 Lifejackets

 

 

 $          100

 

Safety Equipment (First Aid, Life Vests, Rope)

 $       1,000

 

3 Electronic Megaphones

 

 $          300

 

Sub-Total

 

 

 

 $     16,800

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

 

 

 

 

 $   204,100


 

APPENDIX Ib:  BUDGETS 1999-2002

 


 

APPENDIX Ic: 1998-1999 Club Budget

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Income

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Student Dues and Fundraising

 

 $ 70,000

 

 

 

 

University Referendum

 

 $   24,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Budget Income for 98-99 Year

 

 $ 94,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expenses

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operations

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NCAA Eligibility Compliance

 

 $     4,500

 

 

 

 

Team Insurance

 

 

 $        600

 

 

 

 

Boat Insurance

 

 

 $     2,000

 

 

 

 

Reservoir Fees

 

 

 $     3,000

 

 

 

 

Boat Storage Rental (Winter)

 

 $     1,000

 

 

 

 

Boat Maintenance

 

 

 $     5,000

 

 

 

 

Recreation Center Fees

 

 $        720

 

 

 

 

Racing Gear (Clothing)

 

 $     2,400

 

 

 

 

Launch Gasoline for Coaches

 

 $        720

 

 

 

 

Vans for Transportation

 

 $     1,200

 

 

Social Events for Team

 

 $     1,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operations Total

 

 

 $   22,140

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regattas

 

 

 

 

 

 

Head of the Des Moines

 

 $     4,420

 

 

Frostbite Regatta

 

 

 $   10,500

 

 

Head of the Charles*

 

 $        270

 

 

Spring Break

 

 

 $   23,450

 

 

San Diego Crew Classic*

 

 $        220

 

 

Midwest Rowing Championships

 $     8,150

 

 

Great Plains Rowing Championships

 $     4,660

 

 

Pacific Coast Rowing Championships*

 $     1,662

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regatta Total

 

 

 $   53,332

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coaching Salaries

 

 

 

 

 

Head Coach

 

 

N/A

 

 

Assistant Coaches (4)

 

 $     8,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coaching Total

 

 

 $   21,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Expenses for 98-99 Year

 

 $   83,472

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Excess Monies for Equipment Purchase

 

 $   10,537

 

 

* Rowers pay additional out-of-pocket regatta costs in excess of their $1000 dues.


 

APPENDIX II:  SAMPLE RACE SCHEDULE

 

FALL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Head of the Des Moines

Des Moines, Iowa

 

Varsity Rowers Only

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Head of the Charles Regatta

Boston, Massachussetts

Varsity Rowers Only

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Head of the Horse Tooth[7]

Fort Collins, Colorado

 

Varsity and Novice Rowers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Duals w/ KSU or Kansas

TBD, Kansas

 

Varsity and Novice Rowers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SPRING

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spring Break - Selected Duals

San Diego, California

 

Varsity and Novice Rowers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

San Diego Crew Classic

San Diego, California

Varsity and Novice Rowers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Duals w/ Texas and/or Baylor

TBD, Texas

 

Varsity and Novice Rowers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Duals w/KSU or Kansas

Boulder, Colorado

Varsity and Novice Rowers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Great Plains Regatta[8]

Topeka, Kansas

 

Varsity and Novice Rowers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Midwest Championships

Madison, Wisconsin

 

Varsity and Novice Rowers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Central Regional Sprints

Oak Ridge, Tennessee

 

Varsity and Novice Rowers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NCAA Championships

TBD

 

 

Varsity Rowers Only

 


 

APPENDIX III: COLORADO CREW  -- WOMEN’S PERFORMANCE

 

                                                              Race Results

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1994

Head of the Kaw

 

 

Kansas City, Missouri

Women's Varsity Four

 

2nd

1994

Head of the Kaw

 

 

Kansas City, Missouri

Women's Varsity Eight

 

3rd

1994

Frostbite Regatta

 

 

Wichita, Kansas

 

Women's Varsity Eight

 

2nd

1994

Frostbite Regatta

 

 

Wichita, Kansas

 

Women's Varsity Four

 

3rd

1995

Great Plains Regatta

 

Topeka, Kansas

 

Women's Open Eight

 

2nd

1995

Great Plains Regatta

 

Topeka, Kansas

 

Women's Open Four

 

2nd

1995

Great Plains Regatta

 

Topeka, Kansas

 

Women's Lightweight Four

 

1st

1995

Midwest Rowing Championships

Madison, Wisconsin

Women's Varsity Lightweight Four

1st

1995

Midwest Rowing Championships

Madison, Wisconsin

Women's Varsity Heavyweight Four

3rd

1995

Pacific Coast Rowing Championships

Sacramento, California

Women's Varsity Lightweight Four

1st

1995

Head of the Des Moines Regatta

Des Moines, Iowa

 

Women's Lightweight Four

 

3rd

1995

Frostbite Regatta

 

 

Wichita, Kansas

 

Women's Open Four

 

2nd

1996

Heart of Texas Regatta

 

Austin, Texas

 

Women's Lightweight Four

 

3rd

1996

Heart of Texas Regatta

 

Austin, Texas

 

Women's Novice Eight

 

1st

1996

Great Plains Regatta

 

Topeka, Kansas

 

Women's Lightweight Four

 

3rd

1996

Great Plains Regatta

 

Topeka, Kansas

 

Women's Open Four

 

3rd

1996

Great Plains Regatta

 

Topeka, Kansas

 

Women's Novice Four

 

3rd

1996

Midwest Rowing Championships

Madison Wisconsin

Women's Varsity Four

 

2nd

1996

Midwest Rowing Championships

Madison Wisconsin

Women's Novice Eight

 

3rd

1996

Pacific Coast Rowing Championships

Sacramento, California

Women's Novice Four

 

1st

1996

Collegiate National Championships

Cincinnati, Ohio

 

Women's Novice Four

 

3rd

1996

Head of the Des Moines Regatta

Des Moines, Iowa

 

Women's Varsity Lightweight Four

2nd

1996

Head of the Des Moines Regatta

Des Moines, Iowa

 

Women's Varsity Lightweight Eight

1st

1996

Head of the Des Moines Regatta

Des Moines, Iowa

 

Women's Varsity Eight

 

3rd

1996

Head of the Des Moines Regatta

Des Moines, Iowa

 

Women's Open Single

 

2nd

1996

Frostbite Regatta

 

 

Wichita, Kansas

 

Women's Varsity Eight

 

1st

1996

Frostbite Regatta

 

 

Wichita, Kansas

 

Women's Varsity Four

 

2nd

1997

Heart of Texas Regatta

 

Austin, Texas

 

Women's Varsity Four

 

1st

1997

Heart of Texas Regatta

 

Austin, Texas

 

Women's Varsity Eight

 

1st

1997

Heart of Texas Regatta

 

Austin, Texas

 

Women's Varsity Lightweight Eight

2nd

1997

Heart of Texas Regatta

 

Austin, Texas

 

Women's Lightweight Four

 

3rd

1997

San Diego Crew Classic

 

San Diego, California

Women's Cal Cup (Varsity Eight)

2nd

1997

San Diego Crew Classic

 

San Diego, California

Women's Varsity Lightweight Four

1st

1997

Midwest Rowing Championships

Madison Wisconsin

Women's Varsity Eight

 

4th

1997

Pacific Coast Rowing Championships

Sacramento, California

Women's Varsity Eight

 

1st

1997

Head of the Des Moines Regatta

Des Moines, Iowa

 

Women's Varsity Eight

 

2nd

1997

Head of the Des Moines Regatta

Des Moines, Iowa

 

Women's Varsity Lightweight Four

2nd

1997

Head of the Charles Regatta

Boston, Massachussetts

Women's Championship Eight

37th of 50

1997

Frostbite Regatta

 

 

Wichita, Kansas

 

Women's Varsity Four

 

1st

1998

Heart of Texas Regatta

 

Austin, Texas

 

Women's Varsity Four

 

3rd

1998

Great Plains Regatta

 

Topeka, Kansas

 

Women's Varsity Four

 

3rd

1998

Great Plains Regatta

 

Topeka, Kansas

 

Women's Novice Lightweight Four

1st

1998

Great Plains Regatta

 

Topeka, Kansas

 

Women's Varsity Eight

 

3rd

1998

Great Plains Regatta

 

Topeka, Kansas

 

Women's Novice Eight

 

2nd

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                     Athlete Achievements

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1995

Christian Purvis

Lightweight Development Camp

 

University of Massachusetts, Amherst

1995

Jade Pittel

Lightweight Development Camp

 

University of Massachusetts, Amherst

1995

Lori Mackey

Lightweight Development Camp - sculls

University of Massachusetts, Amherst

1997

Rachel Purvis

Openweight Pre-Elite Camp

 

ARCO Olympic Training Center, San Diego

 

1997

Gina Mozingo

Lightweight Development Camp

 

Riverside Boat Club, Boston

 

 

1997

Kate Ballow

Openweight Development Camp

 

University of Washington, Seattle

 

 

 


APPENDIX IV: ROWING PROGRAMS, DIV. I, CENTRAL REGION

 

 

Clemson University                                           Clemson, SC

Duke University                                                Durham,NC

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill           Chapel Hill, NC

University of Iowa                                            Iowa City, IA

University of Virginia                             Charlottesville, VA

University of Miami (Florida)                Coral Gables, FL

Michigan State University                                  East Lansing, MI

Ohio State University                                        Columbus, OH

University of Wisconsin-Madison                      Madison, WI

The University of Texas @ Austin                     Austin, TX

University of Kansas                                         Lawrence, KS

Kansas State University                                    Manhattan, KS

University of Tulsa                                            Tulsa,OK

Stetson University                                             De Land , FL

Jacksonville University                          Jacksonville,FL

University of Central Florida                             Orlando, FL

The University of Tennessee-Knoxville Knoxville, TN

Murray State University                                    Murray, KY

Creighton University                                         Omaha, NE

University of Michigan                          Ann Arbor, MI

                                                                                    


 

APPENDIX V:  HOW ROWING COMPARES TO OTHER SPORTS

 

 

 

Rowing

Softball

Lacrosse

Field Hockey

Ice Hockey[9]

Number of Varsity Programs

1997-98

1998-99

112

120

779

831

199

213

233

240

29

40

Number of Programs

Division I  

Big 12

69

3

232

10

66

0

73

0

16

0

Allowable Scholarships

20

12

12

12

N/A

Participants 1996-97

Division I

All Divisions

2620  3951

3992 13167

1383

4068

1589

4857

201

436

Number of Contests

Minimum Allowable

Maximum Allowable

6

20

27

56

10

17

11

20

20

34

Average Number     of Participants

50-70

15-25

15-25

15-25

15-25

 

 

 

 

 



[1] Novice Men's Coach, Colorado Crew, 1997-present, Head Coach, 1994-95

[2] Novice Women's Coach, Colorado Crew, 1997-present

[3] Virtually all collegiate rowing programs have "novice" and "varsity" squads. Novices are generally first year rowers, although high school recruits usually row on the novice team before moving up to Varsity. With the exception of NCAA Championships, novices compete against each other at every regatta.

[4] In 1996 there were 87 varsity women's rowing programs.  This year (1998-1999) there are 120 programs; 69 of those are Division I. 

[5] Ashlee Patten, Assistant Coach, UVA

[6] Amy Perko, Associate Athletic Director and SWA, University of Kansas

[7] Proposed new head race to be hosted by CU on Horsetooth Reservoir, Ft. Collins, Colorado.

[8] Eventually this regatta would be replaced by a Big 12 Conference Championship.

[9] According to the NCAA, Women’s Ice Hockey is still considered an emerging sport.  It could become a Championship sport in 2 years, provided it meets certain criteria.